Destination – Kakadu II of III

kakadu-on-the-australian-map

map-ubirr1

Cahill’s Crossing

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Cahill’s Crossing in the dry season.

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Ubirr

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Jacob Nayinggulu

The above photo is displayed on signage at Ubirr in Kakadu.  Jacob Nayinggulu is a respected clan leader and one of the Ubirr regions traditional landowners.

kakadu-visitors-guide-cover-only“Our land has a big story. Sometimes we tell a little bit at a time. Come and hear our stories, see our land. A little bit might stay in your hearts. If you want more, you can come back…”

Jacob Nayinggul, MANILAKARR CLAN

Source: Kakadu National Park Visitor’s Guide

ubirr

Excerpt from: ‘Historic and Prehistoric Perspectives: Aboriginal Rock Art in Australia

Clanspeople are responsible for preventing trespass on sacred sites in their estate where rocks, water sources or trees constitute the transformed remains of ancestors, their camp sites or implements. These sites contain the creative power of the ancestors which can be released to propagate their animal descendants, and which supplies the clan with spirits of unborn children. While defending their sacred sites, clans permit mutual access to the remainder of the estate. Members of other clans have to ask the owners’ permission to forage on their estate, but such permission is not normally refused. Foraging bands, and camps, typically contain members of several clans.

The extent to which the indigenous communities of northern Australia have been able to maintain these traditions varies. The first mission station in the Western Kimberleys was established in 1912. Members of the various ‘tribes’ (speakers of particular languages) in the Kimberleys were brought together at these missions. Until the Second World War such settlements were located on the lands of their indigenous inhabitants, but since then a series of moves have left most people separated by up to 300 kilometres from their estates. In much of eastern and central Arnhem Land many people have left missions and government settlements and re-established ‘outstations’ on their own land. The edge of Western Arnhem Land, and the country between Arnhem Land and Darwin, however, suffered immensely from European colonization. The people were decimated. Survivors lived with itinerant buffalo shooters or worked on cattle ranches (stations) until the creation of the Kakadu National Park gave recognition of indigenous title to their land to many survivors.”

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ubirr-gallery

park-ranger-at-ubirr-main-gallery

craig-and-brett-on-the-escarpment-at-ubirr

kakadu-visitors-guide-cover-only‘A moderately steep, 250 m climb takes you to the top of a rocky lookout that offers superb views over the Nadab floodplain, particularly beautiful at sunset. Allow at least 1 hour. Open April 1 to Nov 30 from 8.30am – sunset. Dec 1 to March 31 from 2.00pm – sunset. During the dry season, rangers provide informative talks about Aboriginal art and culture several times a day.‘ – Kakadu National Park Visitor’s Guide page 38.

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Sunset at Ubirr

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Craig’s Muirella Park campsite.

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nabulwinjbulwinj-the-female-eating-spirit-rock-art

nabulwinjbulwinj-the-female-eating-spirit-cu

lightening-spirit

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Burrunggui

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Gun-warddehwardde Lookout

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Barrk bushwalk

‘Branching off the Nourlangie lookout track, just past the main gallery, this is a difficult 12 km walk through the sandstone country of Nourlangie, past the Nanguluwur art gallery and back to the Nourlangie car park. See the Barrk Walk Park Note available from Bowali Visitor Centre. Allow 6 to 8 hours.’

Source: Kakadu National Park Visitor’s Guide page 41.


craigs-climb-at-nourlangie

chute-in-the-stone-country

craig-climbing-up-through-a-chute

looking-down-at-the-plains

craig-climbing-behind-nourlangie-at-kakadu

shelter-up-in-the-stone-country

looking-down-at-the-gunwarrdehwarrde-lookout

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top-of-stone-country-at-nourlangie

the-pillar

overhanging-rock-shelters-cu-at-nourlangie

view-from-shelter-on-opposite-side-of-barrk-saddle

nourlangie-rock-seen-from-stone-country







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